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THOSE BAD HABITS OF YOURS ARE ACTUALLY GOOD FOR YOU

bad habits, a messy room

Most bad habits are often portrayed in a negative light , here are bad habits that are actually good for you ;

Drinking A Lot Of Coffee

  People who drink four cups on daily basis have an 11% lower risk of heart failure, compared to those who did not.

 Historically,coffee has been thought to be wildly unhealthy . People have pointed fingers at your daily cup of hot caffeine for decades, claiming it is the culprit behind most health horrors.

It’s Actually Good For You Because: Not only does coffee not give you a heart attack , it’s actually full of antioxidants — and studies have proven that coffee offers many benefits. 

 

Honestly, who doesn’t love to wake up to a steaming cup of coffee or treat themselves to a frothy latte as an afternoon pick me up? Well, java lovers, it’s your lucky day.

 Coffee actually is full of antioxidants and some studies have shown it offers a ton of health benefits Additionally, some studies prove that women who drink two or three cups a day are 15% less likely to be depressed. So, next time you’re shamed for indulging in an afternoon cappuccino, say you’re just improving your health!

Studies have suggested that coffee may:

Help prevent premature death, reduce mortality, protect against cirrhosis, reduce the risk of multiple sclerosis, protect against colorectal cancer

Some of these claims need to be confirmed by further research.

 

 Sleeping In

Your mind is surprisingly busy while you snooze. During sleep you can strengthen memories or “practice” skills learned while you were awake (it’s a process called consolidation).

 

Those who look like they’re oversleeping may just be doing themselves a lot of good. They may also be spared some of the problems that plague the chronically underslept, like overeating junk food — folks who under-sleep are more likely to eat larger portions of less nutritious foods. So really, if you think about it, sleeping extra is kind of exactly like working out, Right?

 When it comes to the weekend, getting a few extra hours can actually be a good thing. Additionally, waking up when your circadian rhythms tell you it’s time to rise rather than dragging yourself out of bed simply because your alarm went off can actually help keep your metabolism high.

 NAGGING

Sometimes, you’ve just got to let off that steam. Suppressing your emotions and pushing them down deep is not that healthy.  Always looking on the bright side of life doesn’t necessarily make you a happier person. Being realistic about your life — both the good and bad aspects of it — has been shown to yield a healthier overall mental outcome.

 

 People who suppress their negative feelings have worse physical health than people who are unafraid to get in touch with their own notsopleasant side. So complain about what bothers you confident in the knowledge that you’re doing it for your own good.

 Well…  You definitely don’t want to take things too far and constantly spew aggression and rage at everyone for even the smallest issues – no one wants to spend time with someone who behaves like that. However, bottling things up is not always the best solution. Losing your temper every now and then can actually reduce the effects of stress—so sometimes, you’ve just got to let off that steam.

 

 Biting Your Nails

 That clicking sound you make when your teeth bite down on your nail is horrifying. Anyone who has struggled with the bad habit of biting their nails knows that it’s something with no positives, right? After touching goodness knows what throughout your day.

  Yes, biting your nails means introducing germs directly into your orifices. But that isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Some doctors have theorized that this small-scale exposure to germs help you build up your immunities, making you less likely to get sick in the long run. You’re on your own with that biting-clicking noise, though. Shudder.

   Of course, there are other downsides to the habit – many serious nail-biters have experienced the pain of biting a little bit too much – and if you want lovely nails straight out of a nail polish advertisement, you may want to curb your habit.

 Chewing Gum

Society thinks its bad for you, how could it be good for you? It doesn’t have any nutritional benefits:

 Chewing gum focuses us. Gum chewing has been proven to be a better study and test-taking aid than caffeine, and a recent study  found that most students who chewed gum outperformed their gum-free peers on a battery of cognitive tests — a boost that went away once the gum had made its way to the underside of everyone’s chair.

All the repetitive motion might affect your jaw, and let’s be honest, it can be irritating to those around you if you’re constantly chewing gum with your mouth open or snapping your gum. However, those who easily get off task might want to pick up a few packs of the minty fresh treat, because it turns out that chewing gum can actually help you focus. So, next time you have a big work project and you really need to focus, pop in a piece of gum.

Popping some of the bubble stuff gives you a temporary advantage over your peers.

 

 Being Messy

Having a neat space is seen as something to aspire to. However, those of you who just can’t seem to keep things from getting messy for more than a few minutes, take comfort in the fact that your messiness might actually kind of be a good thing.

Being messy, helps boost creativity. A messy work desk or bedroom is often perceived as a sign of being disorganized

Society thinks being messy shows that you have no discipline. Is it really that hard to make the bed? Or put your dishes in the sink? Or store your clothes in your closet.

Messiness and creativity are strongly correlated, and that “while cleaning up certainly has its benefits, clean spaces might be too conventional to let inspiration flow.”

Messy people have been found to be 36 percent more efficient than their up and tidy others. So, if you’re in a creative job and your desk is a little messy – that’s good buddy!

 

 Fidgeting

 What are you, five years old? Fidgeting is thought to be a sign of being unable to focus.

Everyone knows that, in addition to trying to carve out time to exercise, they should make an effort to include more general activity in their lives, such as  taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Fidgeting is just another way to squeeze in activity!

 Research shows that it can burn a few hundred extra calories a day, which means you’ll find it easier to shed those last few pounds.

  Fidgeting is actually classified as a form of “non-exercise activity thermogenesis,” a category which covers the small activities we do all day long that burn calories.

Wiggling in your seat, compulsively tapping your foot, and otherwise annoying your co-workers increases your metabolism and can play a positive role in our overall physical fitness.

Now, if you can absolutely never sit still, and you’re constantly fidgeting even when you know you shouldn’t be, that might be another issue – but if your leg is always bouncing when you watch television or when you’re just sitting at your desk, that might actually be a good thing. So pen-clickers, go crazy—you may just be on the road to better health. 

Gossiping

Okay, let’s get real for a second – most of us get a bit of a thrill out of gossiping. Sure, we know it may not be the kindest thing in the world, and most of us will try to put a stop to actual vicious gossiping. However, it can be a ton of fun to dish about a friend’s new romance with your other friend, 

Why do we have such a fascination with gossip?

If you’re constantly down on yourself about your love of gossip, you may actually be in luck – studies say that gossiping can actually have some benefits. It can help you bond with whoever you’re gossiping with, it can help you learn a bit more about the individuals and situations around you, and laughing over some scandalous gossip can release some feel-good hormones that help combat stress and anxiety.

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Skipping a shower

 

Showering repeatedly isn’t good for you. When you shower, the good and bad bacteria is wiped off from your body. Along with the bacteria, a shower extinguishes all your body’s natural oils that is necessary to keep your skin hydrated, healthy, supple and youthful.

Okay, obviously, it’s not great for your health – or your social life – if you constantly skip showers and maintain a nauseating odor 24/7. You’ve got to stay clean. However, if you skip a shower every now and then, it may not be the worst thing in the world.

 Obviously, you shouldn’t skip a shower if you’ve undergone a grueling work out and have had a particularly sweaty day. However, if you’ve just been kicking around the house, relaxing and watching Netflix, and you just don’t feel like showering – that’s alright.

 Your skin and hair could use a little bit of a break – just make sure not to leave it for too long, or all the benefits will be outweighed by your noxious odor.

 

Playing video games

Everyone knows that a sedentary lifestyle is no good – we’re constantly told to take a little break to walk around, get moving, and get our butts out of those chairs every now and then. So, it only makes sense that the type of video games where you’re plopped on the couch, not moving for hours at a time, would be a bad habit you’d want to break, right? Not really.

 Video games, like many other things, can definitely be addictive, and if you find yourself closing the blinds and turning down all plans with friends in order to log a few more hours playing your game of choice, that’s definitely not healthy. However, they actually have some surprising benefits.

 Studies have shown that children who play video games after chemotherapy treatments need less pain-killing medication, and individuals with back pain and burns also find that the engrossing nature of video games can take their minds off their discomfort.

 Burping and farting:

Basically, burping isn’t the bad habit – not burping is! Now, that doesn’t mean you should walk around burping the alphabet in a public place, but it does mean that you shouldn’t feel so embarrassed about it happening.

, burping may be rude, but as it turns out, it’s really actually good for you. Burping is basically a release of natural gas in your stomach and it’s pretty important to the way your body functions. It’s actually a completely normal part of digestion and stopping yourself from doing it when you feel one coming on is bad for you.

 Farting is particularly beneficial for relieving bloating; preventing oneself from breaking wind can be incredibly painful. Nick Read, a British gastroenterologist, warns, “If you don’t belch and the gas stays on the stomach, this can cause the valve that separates the gullet and the stomach to relax, allowing stomach acid to splash up into the gullet, triggering heartburn.” As for farting, “We evacuate wind for a reason—it forms in the bowel and we need to get rid of it. Holding it back can also trigger pain.

 Releasing this gas helps to relieve that horrible bloating feeling you can get after eating sometimes. Not farting can actually be pretty painful. If you really need to do it, I wouldn’t suggest letting one rip in the middle of all of your friends – awkward.

  Daydreaming: Helps problem solving.

Daydreaming can occupy up to a third of our waking lives and is often viewed as a sign of laziness and inattentiveness.

 However, research has shown that the “executive network” in our brain is highly active when we daydream. Activity in numerous brain regions while daydreaming, including areas associated with complex problem solving.

 These regions were more active during a daydream than during routine tasks. It is believed that when an individual uses conscious thought they can become too rigid and limited in their thinking.

 When you daydream,you may not be achieving your immediate goal—say, reading a book or paying attention in class—but your mind may be taking that time to address more important questions in your life, such as advancing your career or personal relationships. When individuals are engaged on one task, daydreaming can trigger reminders of other, concurrent goals so that they do not lose sight of them.

 

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