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NO LONGER HEADSCARVES IN AUSTRIAN PRIMARY SCHOOLS

Europe was always considered as a continent with great diversity. Numerous countries with various histories are combined to one. After millions of people take refuge there, populists and nationalists used the population´s uncertainty for their purposes. It can be described as a political shift to the right.

While in some countries like Germany the nationalistic parties get appalling high election percentages and are part of the governmental opposition, they have an even greater impact in Austria. Some days ago, the chancellor Sebastian Kurz, head of ÖVP (Conservative People´s Party), stated that he wants to ban headscarves of children under the age of 10 in kindergarten and schools.

This law is a continuing act to the prohibition of fully cover-up in October 2017. This decree is supposed to ban Muslim cover-ups from Austrian streets, but consequently, the ban contains the need of the face being cleared from forehead to chin. Accordingly, because of national security, children face makeup is prohibited in the entire nation.

The FPÖ (Austrian Freedom Party) named the prevention of discrimination in young ages as the reason for their means. Do they really think that the problem is solved immediately if they just illegalize the object of discrimination? They rather go after the victim than combating the reasons of the culprits. Children don´t bully just out of nowhere, there is a close contact with the education they have received so far. Therefore, parents should be lectured to teach their kids tolerance and respect in face of other beliefs. It´s not the Muslim´s fault, that families don´t educate their kids well how to treat each other.

The upcoming law only affects a small group of people, because usually, Muslim girls start wearing hijabs during puberty. Regarding that, the ban should be more considered as a symbolic act, said Sebastian Kurz. How far did they go when statutes are used by politicians to make symbolic statements?

Laws are supposed to be for the people, for all people.

 

 

Story by: Elisabeth Fitzke/Pinkfmonlinegh.com

 

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